Approximately 54 million Americans have low bone density or osteoporosis. Join us in raising awareness about osteoporosis and bone health!

There are several ways to participate in Osteoporosis Awareness and Prevention Month!

There is so much you can do to spread awareness and show your support by using social media. It’s more important than ever that we come together to support each other, rally our communities and raise awareness about bone health during Osteoporosis Awareness and Prevention Month in May! This user-friendly toolkit contains everything you need to share information on social media with your peers, colleagues, friends, family and in your community. It is complete with posts, tweets and images, making it easier for everyone to spread the news far and wide about the importance of exercise and good bone health.

Toolkit for 2023 coming soon!

BHOF’s handy digital calendar shares 31 Ways to Stay Bone Strong. If you learn and practice one tip for each day in May, you will be well on your way to helping to protect your bones! Each date links to a vetted action, fact or resource that will help you live a healthy, active life.

Calendar updates coming soon!

Free Webinars: Details coming soon! 

If you missed out on the webinars last year, you can still view the recordings below!

De-Stressing in Nature for Bone Health: https://vimeo.com/715685685

Walking/Running for Your Bone Health: https://vimeo.com/707893959

Mindful Movement for All Ages: https://vimeo.com/710891343

Bone Healthy Advice: Exercise, Nutrition, Mindfulness: https://vimeo.com/712991063

New Podcast Episode Coming in May for Osteoporosis Awareness & Prevention Month

Details coming soon!

Listen and learn more here: bonetalk.org

Tune in to these past episodes:

Whether you’d like to connect with fellow osteoporosis patients or get more involved to help those suffering from the disease, we have resources available to help you. Follow the links below to learn how you can join our online community, start or join a BHOF Support Group or find an osteoporosis event happening in your own community. Find the resources you need:

If you or someone you love has osteoporosis (or weak or brittle bones) or low bone density, you have the power to improve how we care for these diseases by sharing your experiences.

A first of its kind tool in the osteoporosis field, the Healthy Bones, Build Them for Life® Patient Registry surveys patients and caregivers about how osteoporosis and low bone density impact their lives. This patient-reported information is collected anonymously, combined, and analyzed by the Bone Health & Osteoporosis Foundation (BHOF) to map out the patient journey. This map will show BHOF and the broader bone health community what patients need and want most.

Raise awareness about osteoporosis by telling others about your experiences. Sharing your journey will help others understand the impact of this disease and gain an understanding of what it’s like for someone who has it.

Visit our blog, Bone Talk, to get inspiration from our Voices of Osteoporosis stories like the ones below.

If you’d like to be featured, click here.

Give during the month of May to help improve patient care and support for those who have already broken bones due to osteoporosis and to protect future generations from this debilitating disease.
Donate today!

Visit the BHOF fundraising page (coming soon!) to learn more and register. You can then personalize your fundraiser with stories, photos and videos. It only takes a few minutes. Then invite your friends, family and network to support your fundraiser. You can even donate to yourself to get the ball rolling.

Osteoporosis is responsible for an estimated two million broken bones per year, yet nearly 80 percent of older Americans who suffer bone breaks are not tested or treated for osteoporosis.

Eating a healthy diet and exercising regularly can help slow or stop the loss of bone mass and help prevent fractures.

A woman’s risk of fracture is equal to her combined risk of breast, uterine and ovarian cancer.

A man is more likely to break a bone due to osteoporosis than he is to get prostate cancer.

Additional Resources

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